Archive Oct 1-15

MONDAY   October 15, 2001

TERRORIST POLITICIANS  The New York Times publishes an opinion piece by Hernando de Soto on "the constituency of terror," a summary of the arguments in his latest book The Mystery of Capital.  He suggests that "the long-term fight against terrorism needs to offer millions of potential warriors a formal stake in the economic system they are striving to join."   De Soto also suggests that the Shining Path were defeated in part by giving the poor "legal land claims."  


NOSTALGIC POLITICIANS  The Stanford Daily (Stanford University, California) was granted a 20 minute interview with one of its most famous alum, President Alejandro Toledo, who says that sometimes he wishes he could just return "to Stanford University and shoot some pool, just to get away from it all."


BUSH CAN LEARN FROM FUJIMORI  The Miami Herald runs a column that includes the suggestion that Bush could learn from Fujimori's propaganda expertise so exquisitely shown when Abimael Guzman was forced to appear "in a cartoonish prison uniform, severely deflating the Maoist guerrilla group's image of invincibility."


UN SPEECHES   M2 Presswire reports that UNDP Program Officer Raul Salazar spoke before the United Nation's Second Committee on poverty reduction.  "Poverty constituted a violation of some of the most basic human rights, including the right to food and health care, " said Salazar.  M2 Presswire also reports that Peru's First Secretary at the United Nations Alfredo Chuquihuara spoke before the United Nation's Third Committee on drugs saying that "the breadth of the drug problem required that all countries and regions maintain an integrated approach."


CLEAR CORRUPTION   EFE reports on Transparency International's annual report on corruption around the world.  The report states that "the situation in Peru was hopeful as the new government was not expected to follow the corrupt practices of the former administration of ex-president Alberto Fujimori."


UP & DOWN    Bloomberg charts Peru's increasing foreign reserves which now stand over US$8.8 billion, the highest since 1998.    Bloomberg also charts declining trade balance figures using data from Peru's Central Bank.


NEW PERUVIAN PRESIDENT   Intrafish reports that the newly formed International Fishmeal and Fish oil Organization (IFFO) has appointed its first president, Peruvian Ivan Orlic Maracic.  A sign of his leadership abilities, Intrafish states that 27 Peruvian fish meal companies in Peru have become Members of IFFO, "representing over 80 per cent of national production," as a result of Orlic's activities.  Orlic is President of Servicios Flipper in Chimbote.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: anchovy fishing,  Banco de Credito, Gilat Peru, internet service,  Pesquera San Antonio.   SABI reports that INCA SUR has gone bankrupt.


CHAMBI IN ARGENTINA  EFE reports that an exposition on Peruvian photographer Martin Chambi (1891-1973) is on display through November 20 at the Isaac Fernandez Blanco Museum in Buenos Aires.  Many photographs are from the Chambi archives in Cuzco but others were "retrieved from the archives of Buenos Aires newspapers La Nacion and La Prensa, which published Chambi photos as far back as 1930, when the Cuzco-Buenos Aires railroad was inaugurated."  Other Chambi photographs can be seen at a site hosted by a Duke University graduate student.


NO NEED FOR A TEAM DOCTOR
UPDATE: TeamTalk reports that Estudiantes de Medicina tied up over the weekend with Sporting Cristal.                                    
Inside a long article on Latin American soccer/football, the Miami Herald reports on Peru's national soccer coach Julio Cesar Uribe, denying reports of his dismissal.  It also offers this parochial tidbit: The biggest surprise of the domestic league is Estudiantes de Medicina, a recently promoted team from the desert town of Ica, which was founded a few years ago by a group of medical students. Estudiantes beat Alianza Atletico last week to remain third in the standings."



SUNDAY   October 14, 2001

EDITOR'S  POOR JUDGMENT   1).The Tampa Tribune (Florida) runs a New York Times story on Osama' bin Laden's terrorist international network.  Although the story does not mention Peru at all, the editors at the Tribune saw fit to lead the article with an Associated Press photograph of protesters in Lima on Friday, demonstrating against the USA military strikes on Afghanistan.      2). The New York Daily News "takes a look at the fates of some of the most evil terror-mongers of our times" and lists Tupac Amaru leader Victor Polay, "responsible for more anti-American attacks than any other terrorist organization in Latin America.   ...  Polay still languishes in Limas Callao naval prison."


MONDAYS WON'T BE THE SAME  EFE reports that 'Extasis,' the soap-opera running on Channel 2, Frequencia Latina, has been pulled off the air after pressure from "religious and other groups." The show portrayed "teenage drug addiction, drug-trafficking and prostitution in the highest spheres of Lima society ."


WORLDWIDE HUNT   EFE and Xinhua file reports on Interpol's arrest warrant for Peruvian General Victor Malca Villanueva after the Mexican judicial system did the same last Thursday (see Peruvia's Archives).


NO AMBIGUITY  The Associated Press (in both the Washington Post and the New York Times) lists world leaders' comments about supporting the USA war on terrorism.  Alejandro Toledo is quoted as saying that "any act of terrorism in Peru, Latin America or in the world will be rejected without ambiguity."


GIVE ME THE CREDIT  A story in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution defends the USA intelligence agencies claiming that the USA "continues to have the world's largest and most effective intelligence agencies. They captured ...  the leaders of the Shining Path in Peru. In due time, they will find those who masterminded the horrible murders in September."


IT'S PRETTY COLD  The New York Times takes the economic temperature of Latin America and finds canceled mining investments in Peru.


'FABULOUS COFFEE'  The Boston Globe reports on international coffee consultant George Howell testing several coffees.  The one considered "fabulous" in a taste test turns out to be "from San Isidro, Peru, where 15 to 20 farmers cultivate about two hectares (about 5  1/2 acres) apiece, in one of the highest spots in the country - which, says Howell, accounts for the coffee's brilliance."


THREE TIMES' BOOKS  1). The Washington Times reviews "What If? 2: Eminent Historians Imagine What Might Have Been," an edited volume whose "concluding essay is by the respected historian William H. McNeill who wonders what might have happened had Francisco Pizarro not found potatoes in Peru.   ...   What the Spaniards called chuno 'played a larger part in shaping the subsequent history of the world than did all the gold and silver that so delighted Pizarro and his successors,' argues Mr. McNeill."
2).  The Japan Times reviews Chef Nobuyuki Matsuhisa's "Nobu: The Cookbook" which "lays bare the superchef's secrets, making it possible for anyone to create a Nobu-style feast at home for considerably less than the $150 average price of a dinner at a Nobu restaurant."  Matsuhisa's first restaurant was in Lima in 1972 (he includes Peruvian recipes in his book.)  In September, Chef Nobu related some of his Peruvian culinary experiences in The New York Times.
3).  The Times (London) reviews Alan Bennet's "Laying on of Hands" which includes a main protagonist who dies while on holiday in Peru.


TRAVEL TO PERU   1).The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports on new US$406 round trip fares between Atlanta and Lima on American Airlines.   2). In a Q&A in the travel section of the Observer (London), it is suggested that "the cheapest way to do the historic [Inca Trail] route is to book your trek when you get to ... Cuzco."   3). The Times (London) in a piece on children and travel suggests that the Inca Trail is "perfect for: inquisitive children five and up (although probably better for eight upwards."


Of Special Interest:   The Times of London, in an article on UN sanctioned 'World Monuments' asks "Have you ever heard of Apurlec in northwest Peru, "one of the largest pre-Columbian settlements in the Americas"?   ....    The Jordan Times reports that Mike Toner, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution won an 'honorable mention' in the 'series' category in the biennial Media Save Art awards for his six-article investigation on lost and stolen treasures of Peru."   ....  The Sun-Herald (Florida) reports on two Protestant missionaries and their experiences in Huanuco during the September 11 terrorist attacks.   Upon watching the tragedies on television, they said that "the sound was in Spanish but we didn't need sound to understand that our country was in trouble."


FRIDAY   October 12, 2001

BROTHERS IN ARMS
The Associated Press files a photograph of Peruvian firefighters observing a moment of silence on the one month anniversary of the terrorist attacks in the USA.        EFE and Agence France Press report that Peruvian recording artist Gian Marco and Emilio Estefan will be singing their song "El Ultimo Adios" at the White House later this week as a tribute to those who died in the terrorist attacks in the USA.


NEWSBRIEF  EFE reports that a LanPeru plane was searched in southern Chile after receiving a bomb threat.


TERROR SEEN FROM LIMA  The Associated Press (in the Washington Post and MSNBC) reports on a press conference held in Lima by Peruvian Admiral Alfonso Panizo, the head of the National Intelligence Council.  Panizo confirmed reports from last month that "international terrorists are using [Peru] as a transit hub but not as a base of operations."  The story also states that Peruvian Interior Minister Fernando Rospigliosi said that "authorities have no evidence that bin Laden's network ever operated in Peru."  Previous comments by Montesinos seemed to allow that possibility.


TERROR SEEN FROM WASH. DC  The USA State Department's Washington File reports on the relationship between Latin America and terrorism.  The first Washington File report is on Ambassador Francis Taylor, the coordinator for counterterrorism, who testified on Wednesday before the USA Congress.  "Latin America has lengthy experience with terrorism  ...  terrorism has been a fact of life in many Latin American countries such Peru," said the Ambassador.   He also said that "27 deaths so far this year, the majority of which were civilians" can be attributed to the Shining Path."    The second Washington File report is on Ambassador James Mack, deputy assistant secretary of state for international narcotics and law enforcement affairs who noted that the Peruvian terrorist organization Shining Path carried out its murderous activities "largely funded by taxes on cocaine trafficking."


A WORLD BANK STUDY  AllAfrica.com reports on a study released by the World Bank in its World Development report for the year 2002.  On the importance of media, the report cites the example of the Vladi-videos.


AN ILO STUDY  EFE reports on a study released by the International Labour Organization on child labour and expresses concern for the children working in mines including Peru.  The reports claims that "150,000 children in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador work in small-scale gold mines that are unstable and pose serious health hazards.   ...   The livelihood of about 400,000 people in the three countries depends on the mining industry."  The study was by the ILO's International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC).  A rare positive note was that in Peru, "there is no longer any evidence that children are being used to access the mines' narrow corridors, which was a common practice until Peruvian legislators condemned it."

MINING THE NEWS    Energy and Mines Minister Jaime Quijandría gives an interview to Reuters.  (See yesterday below for his interview to Bloomberg.)   He says that "Peru, which just ended an economic downturn and depends on mining for half its exports, will not be dragged down by the current drop in base metal prices."  While the Peruvian economy grew by 0.7%  in August, Quijandría said that mining, meanwhile, grew 23 percent in that month. Mining, he said, provides 27 percent of the government's tax revenues.


PERUVIAN ZINC & COPPER   AsiaPulse, Bloomberg, the Canada Newswire, and Reuters all report that the Antamina mine has achieved "commercial production," has done so "under budget" and several months ahead of schedule.  Antamina will be among the largest and lowest cost copper-zinc producers in the world with average annual production at 675 million pounds of copper and 625 million pounds of zinc in the first ten years with a mine life in excess of 22 years.    Bloomberg reports that "Peru's benchmark selective index rose 1.2 percent to 1846.01 points led by zinc mining company stocks, with eight shares gaining, four falling and three remaining unchanged." The article also includes good news on Peruvian companies such as Volcan, Atacocha, Credicorp, and beer manufacturer Backus & Johnston.


PERUVIAN GOLD   Reuters interviews a manager of Yanacocha, Latin America's largest gold mine, who says that the mine would "benefit from higher gold prices amid world economic woes."  Production is expected to be a record 2.3 million ounces in 2002.  "Ultimately (world economic woes) will have a benefit for Peru at a time when some of its other commodities will decline," he said.  Reuters says that "Peru is the world's No. 8 gold producer, but the poor Andean nation has been battered by tumbling prices in base metals like copper and zinc."  Yanacocha is two and a half times bigger than the next largest mine in Latin America, Peru's Pierin.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: the bond market, Endesa, the fishing industry, Modpesa,  Osiptel, pension funds, and PlusPetrol.  


BOOK NOMINATION  The New York Times reports that American Chica by Marie Arana  has been nominated for a National Book Award.  It is a memoir of growing up "half-American and half-Peruvian."  Yesterday, the Washington Post noted that the author will be discussing her book tomorrow in Montgomery County.    Arana is also the editor of the Post's weekly 'Book World.'  The New York Times offers an excerpt of her book.  


THE TIMES LATE AGAIN  The New York Times reports on President Toledo's job program.   EFE reported on Toledo's last speech on Saturday (see below) but Times reporter Clifford Krauss seems to be referring to Toledo's speech on October 1 (see October 2 below) where Toledo promised a job program for 249,000.  The Times quotes the number today at 49,000.   


Of Special Interest  The Atlanta Journal and Constitution includes Peruvian restaurant 'Tierra' in its list of the fifty best local restaurants.  (See yesterday below for restaurant reviews in Atlanta and Los Angeles.)   ....   The Manila Bulletin reports that the Peruvian candidate for Miss Earth has not yet arrived for the October 28 contest held at the University of the Philippines in Quezon City.  The winner will receive $20,000 in cash.




THURSDAY   October 11, 2001

"I'M NOT GUILTY!"   Japan Today, the People Daily (China), and the Miami Herald (using the Associated Press) all run stories on former President Alberto Fujimori's specific denial that he absconded with funds meant for poor children in Peru.   (See below for yesterday's story on Kyodo News Agency receiving Fujimori's fax.)   Fujimori suggested that "the true goal of the accusations is to sway Japanese public opinion against him."


YET ANOTHER WARRANT    EFE and Xinhua post stories from Mexico on the issued arrest warrant for Peruvian General Victor Malca Villanueva that will "pave the way" (Xinhua) for his extradition to Peru.  He is wanted on charges of "corruption, bribery and illicit enrichment, among others," say Mexican officials quoted by EFE.  Malca was a former Defense Minister and the Ambassador to Mexico under the Fujimori administration.


BETTER LATE THAN NEVER  The New York Times joins in the search for former Economy Minster Carlos Boloña Behr. (See below for yesterday's earlier reports.)


NO NOBEL #2  Several American newspapers (including the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times) run an Associated Press preview of today's announcement of the Nobel prize for Literature which named Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa as a possible choice.  The choice, delivered after press-time, was not Vargas Llosa.  (See below for yesterday's press rumours on another Nobel possibility.)


SWEDES LEAVE  The Nordic Business Report reports that two Swedish companies, utility firm Vattenfall and the construction group Skanska,  have sold their interests in jointly-owned Peruvian power company Cahua SA to the US group NRG Energy Inc.  Skanska's President is quoted as saying "We received an attractive offer and have now realised the surplus values that were created."



MINING FOR NEWS  Bloomberg runs an interview in Lima with Energy and Mines Minister Jaime Quijandría, including his views on sales taxes that may affect the mining industry and Peru's hydrocarbons trade deficit.


FEEDING TIME  The Los Angeles Times and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution run restaurant reviews of Peruvian establishments.  The LAT runs a synopsis of the Peruvian Grill in Huntington Beach which specializes in seafood dishes and the AJ-C runs a full piece on the Costa Verde which includes Ecuador and Colombian cuisine on their menu.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: Duke Energy Egenor, Siemens, and telecommunications.


Of Special Interest:    The Washington Post notes that Marie Arana, author of American Chica, will be discussing her memoir of growing up in Peru and the USA this Saturday in Montgomery County.    Arana is also the editor of the Post's weekly 'Book World.'  The New York Times offers an excerpt of her book.   ....      The Miami Herald reports that the city Ica is participating in Miami Beach's Parade of Nations tonight.   ...   The New York Times runs a piece on illegal immigrants in New Jersey (including Peruvian "Jesus") who find their surrounding communities (including the local police force) protecting them.


THURSDAY   October 11, 2001

"I'M NOT GUILTY!"   Japan Today, the People Daily (China), and the Miami Herald (using the Associated Press) all run stories on former President Alberto Fujimori's specific denial that he absconded with funds meant for poor children in Peru.   (See below for yesterday's story on Kyodo News Agency receiving Fujimori's fax.)   Fujimori suggested that "the true goal of the accusations is to sway Japanese public opinion against him."


YET ANOTHER WARRANT    EFE and Xinhua post stories from Mexico on the issued arrest warrant for Peruvian General Victor Malca Villanueva that will "pave the way" (Xinhua) for his extradition to Peru.  He is wanted on charges of "corruption, bribery and illicit enrichment, among others," say Mexican officials quoted by EFE.  Malca was a former Defense Minister and the Ambassador to Mexico under the Fujimori administration.


BETTER LATE THAN NEVER  The New York Times joins in the search for former Economy Minster Carlos Boloña Behr. (See below for yesterday's earlier reports.)


NO NOBEL #2  Several American newspapers (including the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times) run an Associated Press preview of today's announcement of the Nobel prize for Literature which named Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa as a possible choice.  The choice, delivered after press-time, was not Vargas Llosa.  (See below for yesterday's press rumours on another Nobel possibility.)


SWEDES LEAVE  The Nordic Business Report reports that two Swedish companies, utility firm Vattenfall and the construction group Skanska,  have sold their interests in jointly-owned Peruvian power company Cahua SA to the US group NRG Energy Inc.  Skanska's President is quoted as saying "We received an attractive offer and have now realised the surplus values that were created."



MINING FOR NEWS  Bloomberg runs an interview in Lima with Energy and Mines Minister Jaime Quijandría, including his views on sales taxes that may affect the mining industry and Peru's hydrocarbons trade deficit.


FEEDING TIME  The Los Angeles Times and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution run restaurant reviews of Peruvian establishments.  The LAT runs a synopsis of the Peruvian Grill in Huntington Beach which specializes in seafood dishes and the AJ-C runs a full piece on the Costa Verde which includes Ecuador and Colombian cuisine on their menu.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: Duke Energy Egenor, Siemens, and telecommunications.


Of Special Interest:    The Washington Post notes that Marie Arana, author of American Chica, will be discussing her memoir of growing up in Peru and the USA this Saturday in Montgomery County.    Arana is also the editor of the Post's weekly 'Book World.'  The New York Times offers an excerpt of her book.   ....      The Miami Herald reports that the city Ica is participating in Miami Beach's Parade of Nations tonight.   ...   The New York Times runs a piece on illegal immigrants in New Jersey (including Peruvian "Jesus") who find their surrounding communities (including the local police force) protecting them.


WEDNESDAY   October 10, 2001

INTERPOLLED   EFE and Xinhua report that Interpol has officially received an international arrest warrant for former president Alberto Fujimori.    Kyodo received a faxed response from the absconded ex-president late today.


NO INTERPOL YET   The Financial Times catches up with the search for former Economy Minster Carlos Boloña Behr and adds that Boloña was last seen at home on Monday.  The story now leads the Americas page at MSNBC and summaries are carried by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Chicago Times.   Boloña's capital investments include the McDonald's restaurant chain which is expanding by three this year including one in San Juan de Luringancho.


WASHINGTON BOUND   EFE reports that Peruvian drug-czar Ricardo Vega Llona arrives in Washington tomorrow where discussions with the USA government will include the Andean Trade Preferences Act.   The Courier and Mail (Australia) reminds that on October 10, 1998, the presidents of Peru, Colombia and Bolivia meet in Ica, Peru, to develop common drug-fighting strategy.


NO NOBEL  Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto has not been awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences although the Miami Herald added to news of his being short-listed.  (See Monday below for a similar article in the Financial Times).  


BRUNO IS STANDARD AND POOR  Bloomberg interviews Bruno Boccara, director for Latin America sovereign ratings for Standard & Poor's ratings company, who says that "for now, [there is] no pressure either way on the ratings." S&P's long-term, foreign currency rating for Peru is BB-, or three steps below investment grade.
Reuters runs a piece on an increase of consumer demand of 2.3% in September on numbers released by MacroConsult.


PERU IS JUST POOR   UPI's Business and Economics editor's weekly opinion piece on Latin America states that Toledo appears currently to be attempting to harass those foreign businesses that had done business with the Fujimori regime. Peru, already a very poor country, thus appears to be sliding backwards."  MSNBC (using Reuters) runs a story on the Peruvian economy entitled "Democracy is Nice But You Can't Eat It," in which jailed ex-Congressman Alejandro Kouri, interviewed in his jail cell (with a general as a new room-mate), reveals his plans to run again for Congress.


THE TERROR OF POVERTY   M2 Presswire offers UN Ambassador Oswaldo de Rivera's comments at the Committee on Disarmament and International Security in which he declared that today, Latin America's prime conflicts were "internal and rooted in the poverty that still burdened the region. A vital new part of Peru's foreign policy was to redirect resources from defence expenditures to development."   EFE reports on the annual report from the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions
which states unequivocally that "Latin America still most dangerous place for labor unions."   The ICFTU's report on Peru reported that while "unions joined with grassroots organizations to prevent then-President Alberto Fujimori from running for an unprecedented third term ... seven people were killed, sometimes brutally."


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: LanPeru, Manufacturera de Papeles y Cartones,  McDonalds, Odebrecht, and Southern Peru.


OBITUARIES  The Times of London reports that former Ambassador Dick Slater died earlier this week in the United Kingdom.  He was Ambassador to Peru during the Odría administration.


Of Curious Interest  Two papers, the Scotsman and the Economic Times (India), run letters today that seem quaintly similar and include the notion that among the nations bombed by the USA since 1945 is Peru.  One of the letters is written by a "Major General."  Their source appears to be a certain William Blum in whose book 'The CIA: The Forgotten History" entitles a chapter 'Peru 1960-1965: Fort Bragg Moves to the Jungle."  Blum's writings have also led to a defense of the MRTA.


TUESDAY   October 9, 2001

ALMOST UNDER HOUSE ARREST  
UPDATE:  The Associated Press (in online versions of the Washington Post, the New York Times, and MSNBC) and Reuters (in MSNBC) report that police are now "searching" (says the AP) and "hunting" (says Reuters) for former Economy Minster Carlos Boloña Behr who has been ordered to be placed under house arrest.  The AP says that Boloña is heard on an audiotape saying, "And what happens after [the coup d'etat]? I have to be in the palace, but yes, there must be a lot of security around.''  
EARLIER:  Bloomberg reports that Boloña has been ordered to be under house arrest.  While the article does not specifically state that Boloña is not at his house (Lima dailies report that police have surrounded his residence and await his arrival), Bloomberg does quote Boloña's lawyer stating that "If there's sound legal reason, he'll present himself. But if this is nothing but political persecution, he shouldn't. If authorities resort to legal irregularities to deprive someone of freedom, they have a right to resist.''


SHAVING PERCENTAGES   Reuters and Bloomberg report that Economy Minister Pedro-Pablo Kuczynski will "negotiate a 1.8 percent budget deficit goal for 2002 with the International Monetary Fund."  There has been a veritable  battle of numbers  between the Toledo government and the IMF.  Last year's budget deficit was 3.2% of the Gross Domestic Product; this year's "could be 2.3%," says Kuczynski in Reuters.   The IMF wants next year's to be "trimmed down to 1.7%."    Deutsche Latin American Companies Trust reports that Kuczynski's Wall Street trip last week was a success and that they will visit Peru "this month in order to test the mood of company management and the outlook for corporate earnings growth."


PATENT #D395,690  The Philadelphia Inquirer (USA) reports that Peruvian-American Luis Villavicencio has gained a patent for his 'Luvi', an "instructional soccer ball," named after its creator.  An amateur coach, Villavicencio had a production ball made in Pakistan but is now ready to make a remodeled ball.


A REPORT FROM HELL  MSNBC (using a Reuters story) reports from the town of Infierno, two hours up river from Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios.   The piece describes the relationship between the Ese'eja tribe and the Tambopata Research Center.    Rainforest Expeditions, which helps operate the Center, won an environmental award last week. (see Saturday below)


FOCUSED MONIES  The new issue of the American Prospect leads by quoting  Susana Galdos Silva of the Lima-based Movimiento Manuela Ramos on an article on the USA Bush administration's "global gag rule" which denies USAID monies spent on organizations which provide abortions.  Galdos Silva says that "Peru, where abortion is illegal, has the second-highest maternal mortality rate in South America."


OTHER MISSIONARY RETURNS  The Charlotte News-Observer (North Carolina, USA) reports that Jim Bowers, the missionary whose wife and daughter were killed when their plane was shot down near Iquitos last April, has returned to the USA from Peru after a two week visit.  Referring to the investigation which spread blame all around, Bowers suggested that the missionary pilot was innocent on all counts and claimed that the  pilot was "following customary procedure by calling in his flight plan as he approached his landing point."     Pilot Kevin Donaldson recently returned to Peru with his family (see last Tuesday).


PERUVIAN SOCCER LIVES  Despite Peru's disqualification from the 2002 World Cup, TeamTalk reports that Alianza Lima still has a chance to make it to the second round of the MercoNorte by beating Nexaca tonight in Mexico.

OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: Gilat, Nokia, and zinc mining.


Of Special Interest  O Globo (Brazil) reports that President Fernando Henrique Cardoso is scheduling a trip to Lima this November   ....  The Canadian Newswire proffers an invitation to the official opening of the "Mystery of the Moche" exhibit  in Montreal's Museum of Archaeology and History this Thursday at 10:30 am.  In attendance will be Dr. Santiago Uceda Castillo, Director of Trujillo's Museo de Arqueologia y Antropologia e Historia.



MONDAY   October 8, 2001

BOUND FOR SWEDEN? The Financial Times reports that Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto has been "short-listed" for the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, due to be announced on Wednesday.  He is president of the Lima-based Instituto de Libertad y Democracia, and the other author of The Mystery of Capital and The Other Path.  (See also interviews with the Federal Bank of Minneapolis and Reason Magazine.)  He would become the first Latin American to win the Prize in Economics.  On Friday (see below) rumours were floated about Mario Vargas Llosa's possible Nobel Prize in Literature.


ALREADY IN PRAGUE  EFE reports that Justice Minister Fernando Olivera is in Prague at the 10th Annual Anti-Corruption Conference where he declared that "corruption knocks down towers every day" and should be battled just like terrorism.   He also called on Japan to hand former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori over to Peruvian authorities.  The conference is sponsored by the World Bank and Transparency International.
Migration News (from the University of California, Davis) reports today that Japan has said: "Since no extradition treaty exists between the two countries, it is impossible to hand over the former president."


SENDERO AND CARTOONS  The New York Times runs a story on comic books and the November publication of 'Amazing Spider-Man No. 36' which will "tell the story of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack."  The piece refers to cartoonist Igor Kordey's work which includes Cable, a super hero whose enemies include Peru's Shining Path.


A NOTE FROM YESTERDAY   Bloomberg reports that all Peruvian banks and markets will be closed today, Monday, October 8.


SUNDAY   October 7, 2001

MONTESINOS GETS 90 DAYS  EFE reports that jailed ex-spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos will get 90 days in isolation for having given interviews to USA Spanish network Telemundo.  (see Tuesday news below)  EFE quotes Justice Minister Fernando Olivera saying that Montesinos "will not be allowed family or special visits or have access to correspondence." Perhaps as important, he will not have access to newspapers and magazines for that time either.  Montesinos is not cooperating in the investigation and it is unclear whether the prison guards who helped him have been properly identified.


ENVOYS FORMALLY NAMED  EFE reports that, among others, Allan Wagner has been named to be Peru's ambassador to the USA and Carlos Ferrero has been named to represent Peru at the Organization of American States in Washington.


ENTREPRENEUR FORMALLY CHARGED  Bloomberg reports that Aerocontinente's founder Fernando Zevallos will be charged in Lima in on at least two counts: drug-trafficking and corruption involving Montesinos.  Less than 10-years old, Aerocontinente's price-slashing led to the demise of Aeroperu and Faucett in Peru and Avant Airlines in Chile.


PERU HAS LOST  Sporting News reports on last nights qualifying match between Peru and Venezuela in which Peru lost 3-0, finishing the game with only nine players on the field.   Norberto Solano did not play last night.  This shutout certifies Peru's elimination from the 2002 World Cup in Japan/Korea.


Of Special Interest: The Sunday Times of London reports, in their travel section, that while Peru is "arguably the most interesting country" in Latin America, travelers "should wait until May, when it's not too hot, not too cold, not too wet, and not saturated with tourists."   .....   The Boston Herald and the Boston Globe each report that Teatro Yuyachkani, Peru's "most acclaimed theatrical company," performs tonight (5pm and 8pm) at the Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center, 85 W. Newton St., Boston; (617) 927-1744.



SATURDAY   October 6, 2001

POWELL SAYS MRTA NOT THAT BAD   The Washington Post (using the Associated Press) says that Peru's MRTA was not on the revised annual list of sanctioned terrorist groups just-released by USA Secretary of State Colin Powell.  On the State Department's press release, Powell states that "I did not redesignate ...  the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement because I determined that the statutory criteria for redesignation had not been met."  Being placed on thepeu list means that "it is illegal for Americans to provide material support and U.S. financial institutions must block their assets," says the Post.
Curiously, both Reuters and the Associated Press (both in MSNBC) put out a story on the USA State Department linking the Sandinistas directly to terrorism.  Daniel Ortega is running neck and neck in the polls for the November 4 presidential elections.


TOWNSEND SAYS FUJIMORI VERY BAD   EFE reports that a Peruvian congressional committee took "the first step toward an indictment of deposed President Alberto Fujimori on charges of illegal enrichment, embezzlement and misappropriation of funds."  Specifically, Congresswoman Anel Townsend stated that SIN, Montesinos' spy agency, received "between US$20,000 and US$400,000 every month."   The charges against Fujimori earlier in the year included "desertion and dereliction of duty, in addition to crimes against humanity."


FT COMES OUT SWINGING The Financial Times publishes a hard-hitting piece entitled "Protests Put Toledo Under Pressure" but provides little evidence that it is the protests which pressure. (The marches reporter Paul Keller describes are in the "hundreds" and the Lima press has begun questioning some of their ties to Fujimori's cohorts.)  In a highly opinionated piece, Keller dampens Kuczynski's otherwise highly touted Wall Street visit this week, declaring that "the president needs to re-establish his leadership" and quoting a financial analyst saying "It is still not totally clear what the government's economic policy is."    EFE, the Spanish news agency, gives just as realistic version of the story but with less hype.  Elsewhere, EFE  reports on Toledo's press conference in Lima yesterday in which he announced a new work program for those in "extreme poverty."   Whereas the Financial Times touts reports of "cabinet splits" EFE states that the president was "surrounded by his entire cabinet."


US CONGRESS EXPANDS PERU'S EXPORTS Reuters reports that a committee of the US Congress has decided not only to renew the 10-year old the Andean Trade Preferences Act (ATPA) but to "add new duty-free access for certain apparel items and tuna," key provisions for the Peruvian export market.   EFE reports that textile exports to Venezuela almost doubled last year to over US$15 million.


FIRST ECUADOR, THEN CHILE On Thursday (see below), MSNBC reported that Toledo will seek arms reductions when he visits Ecuador next month.  Today EFE reports on Foreign Minister Diego Sayan declaring that efforts of limiting defense spending with Chile are underway "even if Peru fails to 'prevent' Chile from buying F-16 fighter planes from the United States."


TRULY GREEN  BusinessWire reports that American-based World Resources Institute has awarded two of its three 2001 New Ventures Awards to Peruvian businesses:
Rainforest Expeditions, an eco-tourism company and GEA Forestal, a forestry company.   The awards, chosen by Citicorp, were bestowed on companies that succeeded both fiscally and environmentally.  The Financial Times published a story last Monday (see below) that included praise for Rainforest Expeditions.


  TWO INCA TRAILS   Today is the beginning of the 25,000 km/15,000 mi Inca Trail Road Rally and the Associated Press publishes three photographs (one, two, three) of some of the estimated 100 participants who leave Copacabana, Brazil today and, entering Peru through Puno on October 16, going through Cuzco, Ayacucho, Huancayo, Lima, Nazca, Arequipa, leaving Peru through Tacna around October 27.  The race finishes in Rio de Janeiro in late November.   The Irish newspaper Unison includes a travelogue along the more traditional Inca Trail which reports that tour operators in Cusco are charging from $120 to $200 for hiking the four-day trail "depending on tour size and quality of food and guide service."


AIRPORT NEWS  SABI reports that Aldeasa has won a contract for opening up three duty-free shops at Jorge Chavez International in Lima.  SABI also reports that the Peruvian Congress is about to auction the construction rights for Cusco's new airport.  Finally, SABI reports on Air France entering the cargo business beginning with one flight a week between Lima and Paris.   



OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: AT&T Latin America, Credicorp,  Gilat,  mutual funds,  Nextel, Perez Companc,  PetroPeru,  Resistencias Peruanas,  and Quimica Suiza.  Following yesterday's pessimism reported in TheStreet.com, BNAmericas reports on Southern Copper Peru's shrinking window of opportunity for debt-refinancing.  The company has "long-term debt of US$547mn and total current liabilities of US$263mn."  SABI also explains the cuts Southern is having to make.
Bloomberg reports that all Peruvian banks and markets will be closed on Monday, October 8.



FRIDAY   October 5, 2001

NOTED  Business Wire reports that Jorge Ananos, president of Kola Real, based in Ayacucho, was awarded an 'Excelencia Award' by AmericaEconomia, a DowJones magazine.  Kola Real recently opened a plant in Venezuela and has about US$30 million in annual sales.   Business First, a weekly from Louisville, Kentucky, USA, reports on Peruvian immigrant Enrique Rodulfo Pantoja who is building a multi-million dollar retail center in a Louisville suburb.  As president of  Rodulfo Realty & Building Co., Pantoja is also planning to open a "high-end restaurant" with "a group of business people from Lima."


NOTED EVERY YEAR  Agence France Press begins the now annual tradition of publishing rumours that Mario Vargas Llosa is due to win the Nobel Prize for Literature.  Unlike most of the other prizes, the Swedish Academy says that, "in keeping with tradition," the announcement date is announced.  Vargas Llosa's latest book, The Feast of the Goat will be released in English in the USA on November 13 and in Europe later this year.  The author wrote on the "premature obituary of the book" in The New Republic and on the "universal culture of liberty" in Reason Magazine earlier this year.


A SMILING SCHUTZ  EFE reports on the arrest of television magnate Ernesto Schutz's arrest in Argentina (see yesterday) and states that Argentina is asking that Peru submit a formal petition for extradition.  Xinhua, the Chinese news agency, reports that Schutz was carrying "an authentic Swiss passport in which he used his mother's last name.  Schutz has a double nationality, Peruvian and Swiss, due to his ancestors," namely his mother.  Reuters offers the image of an arrested but smiling Schutz (see yesterday).


GOOD NEWS, GOOD BYE The Minister of Economy, Pedro-Pablo Kuczynski, wraps up his trip to New York today.  To see him off, DowJones publishes good news from SUNAT saying that government revenues were up almost 7% last month.  Bloomberg's counterpart article is a bit more upbeat and precise, publishing a chart on INEI's August and Jan-Aug numbers.  A separate Bloomberg article details Peru's monthly oil output which fell last month, charted by contractor.  Daily barrel production in September was 96,747, down by about 1%.  A third Bloomberg piece offers last month's government revenues in which tax revenue's increase offset customs' revenue decrease for a total of almost 7% growth.


GOOD NEWS, HELLO  Britain's ITN reports that the Zapara indigenous group who populate the border between Peru and Ecuador, "once declared extinct by historians and anthropologists, is making a come back."  Zapara representatives offered a press release on May 18, 2001 when their culture was recognised by UNESCO as a masterpiece of the "intangible heritage of humanity" for its oral traditions and other cultural manifestations."  


MINING  While TheStreet.com downgraded Southern Peru Copper from 'long-term buy' to 'market perform,' BNAmericas.com reported good news from the Yanacocha's newest gold mining deposit, the largest gold mine in Latin America, a joint venture between Newmont Mining and Buenaventura.  (The World Bank's IFC also owns 5%.)  Newmont Mining's CFO Bruce Hansen is quoted saying: "We keep asking ourselves the question, 'How big will Yanacocha get?' And, quite frankly, we still don't know."  


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include:  ArtourPeru, PlusPetrol, CESEL Ingenieros, Telefoncia Moviles, and Sigelsa.  LanPeru is offering double miles to those travelling from Asia to Peru through Los Angeles.



THURSDAY   October 4, 2001

ARRESTS AND EXTRADITIONS   An Associated Press story (in ABCNews.com, the Washington Post, and MSNBC) and a Reuters piece (in MSNBC) reports that Ernesto Schutz, president of the Board of Directors of Panamericana Television, (and "chief stake holder" says Reuters) was arrested in Argentina yesterday, as a result of his appearance on a Vladi-video, released on Tuesday, showing him accepting US$350,000 (says the AP) in cash from Montesinos.  Reuters states that US$9,000,000 was promised.   The money was proffered to assure the Panamerianca's support for Fujimori during the 2000 election.  Peru is now seeking his extradition.  Schutz was at work last Friday, people at the network said.  CNN had put out a Reuters piece late yesterday about the manhunt for Schutz.
Late yesterday, the Washington Post on-line (using the A.P. wire)  reported that a Miami judge had approved the extradition of Col. Manuel Aybar Marca, Montesinos' ex-bodyguard, to Peru because "by helping Montesinos escape, Aybar used his government position to procure a benefit for a third party - an action explicitly covered by the treaties."  This morning's Miami Herald reports the same story but adds that Aybar could be returned to Peru this month but a legal challenge to the ruling "could delay Aybar's extradition by a year or more."


INCARCERATING THE INCARCERATED  The Spanish news agency EFE reports that jailed ex-spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos is expected to receive "the stiffest sanctions possible" for his transgressions of conducting an interview whilst imprisoned.  (see below)  Meanwhile, the inspector general's office has recommended that nine prison officials will be "transferred and jailed for up to five days for their role in the interview."  EFE also reports that, in an interview with EFE reporter Patricia Vasquez, ex-first lady/daughter Keiko Fujimori declared that "her father's biggest mistake was trusting" Montesinos.    She is "absolutely certain that the president was unaware of his former adviser's web of corruption and never imagined the extent of it."



FLAT LINING  Several press stories are accompanying Economy Minister Pedro-Pablo Kuczynski's visit to New York.   Bloomberg reports that the Peruvian economy "probably posted zero growth in August, with official INEI numbers coming out tomorrow.  (The Miami Herald prints a short summary of Bloomberg.)  This is an improvement over the three-year long slump which has been due in large part to the mining sector.  The article states that although P-P Kuczynski is forecasting a 5.5% growth for 2002, analysts surveyed by Bloomberg predicted a less rosier 3.9%.   The Financial Times focuses on how last month's terrorist bombings have "set back" the Peruvian economy saying that analysts believed "the change in investor sentiment would most affect Peru's ability to raise funds in the international capital markets."  Nevertheless, the FT's Paul Keller opined somewhat positively that "most analysts agree the economic situation is manageable for Peru, which remains less exposed to a US recession than major exporters to the US such as Brazil and Argentina" due also to the mining sector, but more precisely Antamina whose production "would add one percentage point to Peru's gross domestic product."   Reuters also chimes in with a focus on the planned bond issue Peru is planning.  Seeing positive changes in the current environment, Kuczynski says, "We're assuming lower growth now but we gained on the interest rate reductions because a lot of our international multilateral debt is at a floating rate. So every point reduction (in Libor) saves us $70 million."  Reuters also reports on Peru's negotiations with the Paris Club and the IMF.  Reuters and The Financial Times both scoop Bloomberg saying that P-P Kuczynski is now forecasting only a 4% growth for 2002.


REMEMBERING THE ANDES Following up on yesterday's reports, Reuters reports that the US Congress could begin legislation tomorrow on renewing the Andean Trade Preferences Act (APTA) which allows duty-free exporting of most goods to Peru and three other Andean countries.  (Two key exceptions are textiles and sugar.)


FLOATING BONDS  Bloomberg reports from Lima that Peru's private pension funds will begin investing in securities issued "to finance state concessions, a bid aimed at boosting investment in Peru and giving the funds more investment options."  


AMBASSADORS OSWALDO AND OSCAR    The M2 Presswire quotes extensively from new United Nations Ambassador Oswaldo de Rivera (see yesterday) as he joined in the debate on terrorism in New York.  "It is obvious that the phenomenon of terrorism had followed [the globalisation] route.   ... Peru recently adopted several measures that seeks to become part of the international rules against terrorism [including] ...   the signing of the International Agreement for the Repression of the Financing of Terrorism, as well as the acceptance of the Protocol for the Repression of Illegal Acts against the Safety of the Fixed Platforms Placed on the Continental Shelf."
From Quito, MSNBC (using Reuters) reports in advance of Toledo's visit on October 16 where he will "press for arms reductions."  Mainly constructed around an interview with Peruvian Ambassador in Ecuador, Oscar Maurtua, the article notes that Ecuador will be reluctant to this proposal, believing that they need to be more secure from insurgencies near their border with Colombia.


ART HONORED  The Associated Press reports that Peruvian artist Peruko Ccopacatty will receive the United Nations Society of Writers and Artists Award of Excellence.  Now based in Rhode Island (where he also runs a bed-and-breakfast with his wife), Ccopaccaty is best known for his steel sculptures, work that can cost close to US$100,000.
Ascribe News also reports that Marcos Cueto, a Professor at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia has been named a Fulbright New Century Scholar, one of thirty scholars assigned to a team that will "explore key global health issues."

A HEAVY MONTESINOS The Chicago Tribune offers a story on political exiles in Panama.  It gives several quaint stories of the daily lives of several ex-strongmen.  The Tribune quotes a Panamanian Foreign Ministry official, using Montesinos as an example, saying that "Under this government we see consistent if tentative efforts to change this history of negotiated exile," and recalls the pressure the USA government placed on Panama to accept the ex-Peruvian strongman.  "The government eventually rejected the Peruvian chief of intelligence.  Montesinos was "just too heavy for Panama."

OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: Generali.  There are also updates from yesterday's news (see below) on Gilat and Perez Comanc.


WEDNESDAY   October 3, 2001

  REBEL WITH A CAUSE  Oswaldo de Rivera officially became Peru's Ambassador to the United Nations, reports M2 Presswire.   The paperback version of his latest book, The Myth of Development, was just released in America, a summary of which was put on-line by SudNorNews.   Courier, the Unesco magazine, interviewed Ambassador de Rivera in 1999.


PASSING THE HAT  Reuters reports that Finance Minister Pedro Pablo Kuczynski has begun his tour of New York "to improve Peru's image."  The challenge is not small.  Whereas yesterday's wire stories (see below) reported that Toledo claimed that Fujimori fudged the economic numbers, suggesting that the economy was worse than believed, Kuczynski's job is now to upgrade Standard & Poor's and Moody's Investors Service' low esteem of the Peruvian economy.   These agencies' "negative analyses were rooted in erroneous figures about Peru," said Kuczynski.  The paper says the minister will be in New York until October 10 which should be enough time to visit with his daughter, New York Times media reporter Alex Kuczynski.


WE'VE ALL GOT TERRORISTS  Bloomberg works off of a Wall Street Journal story about several Latin American nation's worry that the USA will lose interest on their behalf.  Pegged around the Andean Trade Preferences Act (ATPA) December expiration, the story quotes an aide in Florida Senator Bob Graham's office, "Our minds have been on different things.''  Ecuadoran Foreign Minster Heinz Moeller reminds that "We need a helping hand to fight another form of terrorism, narco-guerrillas and narco-traffickers."    A late posting at WashingtonPost.com says that Moeller believes both the ATPA and the Andean Region Initiative (ARI) should be part of the anti-terrorism legislation pending in the USA Congress.  
The Massachusetts Daily Collegian reports that in a talk at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst,  Michael Schifter of IADialog.org explained his reserved defence of the ARI.    And yesterday's Christian Science Monitor  ran an op-ed by Peter Hakim, also of IADialog.org, asking the US government not to forget their southern neighbours over the next few years.


HOW DID THEY DO THAT?  MSNBC (using Reuters) has a follow-up on Telemundo's as yet undiscovered technique of how they interviewed the jailed Montesinos.  (see below)  Congresswoman Anel Townsend states, "It's very grave that the security has been violated of the prison where the head ... of a network of serious corruption and violation of human rights is jailed."


YES THERE IS NO ARREST WARRANT  MSNBC (through Reuters) reports that a Peruvian judge states that there is no outstanding warrant to arrest executives of Chilean pasta maker Lucchetti.  Quoting a statement of the superior court of Lima, the story says that, "[Judge Jorge Barreto] said he has given the investigation to prosecutors who will later make an announcement.''   This comes after yesterday's MSNBC (through Reuters) story that the judge had confirmed that indeed there was a warrant, quoting Senior Judge Sergio Salas: ''A warrant has been issued.''   This is all a result of senior Lucchetti officials seen in more than one Vladi-videos whose transcripts can be found here and here.


YES THERE IS AN ARREST  The Spanish news agency EFE reports that Peruvian police have arrested the fourth Chilean in 24 hours at Jorge Prado International Airport yesterday as he was trying to fly to Argentina with two kilos of cocaine.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include:  Aldeasa, Telefonica, Gilat Satellite Networks, Perez Companc, PlusPetrol, Pesquera Colonial, and Disco Ahold.  The Financial Times reports that Aerolinas Argentinas was sold - but not to AeroContinente.


Of Special Interest    In a story about allying the world for war, London's Guardian newspaper insinuates that "the support of Finland or Peru ... is welcome but not essential."



TUESDAY   October 2, 2001

SPEAKING TO THE NATION  EFE, the Associated Press (in CNN) and two Reuters pieces (the first in CNN  and MSNBC, the second in IWon), report on President Toledo's Sunday evening televised speech to the country after 60 days of governing.  (Yahoo runs a related  Associated Press photograph.)  EFE sees a pep talk to the nation while blaming the Fujimori decade for lingering problems.  The first Reuters story goes with the public and pundit reaction to the talk which is apparently dismal.  The second Reuters piece focuses on the blame game following up on Toledo's suggestion that Fujimori "tricked" Peruvians into thinking the economy was doing well.  "The economy didn't grow by (an annual average of) 3.9 percent but by 1.9 percent," said Toledo.   The Associated Press lines up on the job creation line: "President Alejandro Toledo has announced the construction of highways and subsidized housing to provide 249,000 jobs."


LOOK WHO'S TALKING  Bloomberg (using Agence France Press), Reuters (in CNN and MSNBC) and the Associated Press (in ABCNews, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and MSNBC) run a story on Telemundo (a USA Spanish-speaking television network) getting an interview with Montesinos from within his jail cell.  Reuters quotes more extensively from the interview (Montesinos plea to Fujimori: ''Mr. President Fujimori, I believe the time has come for you to return to (Peru) to answer for your actions.  ...  I think that as men you and I should answer to the country for our actions -- you for ordering them and me for carrying them out.")  The Associated Press speculates on how the interview was conducted (likely through Montesinos' lawyer.)  The television station has only thus far run the audio portion of the interview which ran in Lima last night on RRPP.  EFE has a reaction story whereby "Justice Minister Fernando Olivera promised to punish those who violated prison security to allow a foreign TV network to interview imprisoned Vladimiro Montesinos."   Telemundo said it would also this week release other Montesinos statements related to Osama bin Laden, the Saudi-born militant the United States has named as its chief suspect in the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington.


LOOK WHO'S NOT TAKING  EFE reports that former first lady/daughter Keiko Fujimori, who was scheduled to continue briefing a congressional committee on how she spent the 1990s has declined to appear anymore because, "I am not Alberto Fujimori. You cannot compare me to (former Fujimori adviser) Vladimiro Montesinos because I was one of the few people that asked him to distance himself from my father's administration, and you have already found me guilty."  Curiously, she made her statement "accompanied by her mother," who is now an anti-Fujimori member of Congress.


JAPANESE-PERUVIANS DENIED JUSTICE  The United States Supreme Court began a new season of hearing cases today.  The Washington Post, using the Associated Press, and the Washington Times each report that the court denied a hearing to Kato v. U.S., 01-07 which involved Japanese-Americans who were "denied the $20,000 stipends paid under a 1988 law to some 81,000 people who were interned or had property seized after the Japanese Navy's sneak attack at Pearl Harbor," says the Washington Times.  Four of the six litigants "were brought from their homes in Peru and held as bargaining chips for hostage exchanges during the war, then deported in December 1945."   A personal history of these events was published as 'Adios to Tears.'



NUMBER THREE  The Washington Post runs a story from the Associated Press which notes that Julio Fernandez Ramirez died in the World Trade Center bombing.  He is the third Peruvian is confirmed dead from this event.


MISSIONARY RETURNS  The Tri-County newspaper (Pennsylvania) reports that Kevin Donaldson, the pilot of the missionary plane that was shot down near Iquitos in April, has returned to Peru with his family.  "We are hoping that the tragedy will bring opportunity for us to lead others to the saving knowledge of Jesus, and have more Bible studies at the air force base. We were already having a Bible study on the base, but we would like to reach out especially to the pilots who were involved in the air-attack,'' said Donaldson.
The Age (Australia) runs a calendar piece announcing that today marks five years since an Aeroperu Boeing 757 crashed over Pasamayo, killing all 70 on board.  A maintenance man served two years for negligence.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include: Banco Wiese, road cargo transportation, silver mining, Mantaro power, rural electrification, electricity, Alicorp, Credicorp, telecoms, Dynacor, the sugar industry, Wong supermarkets, and mutual funds.


UNDERSTANDING LATINS  Newsweek and the Christian Science Monitor each run separate articles appealing to their North American readers to understand Latin Americans better during this time of crisis.  Newsweek (by Mac Margolis) uses a few quotes to suggest that not all Latin Americans are as gung-ho as their northern counterparts about embarking on war while CSMonitor (by Peter Hakim of IADialog.org) asks the US government not to forget their southern neighbours over the next few years.



MONDAY   October 1, 2001

MOVING SLOWLY  Bloomberg reports that consumer prices in Peru's US$53.5 billion economy rose only 0.06% in September which was less than expected.  Gains were had in fruit, rice, fish; declines were had in cooking gas, kerosene, detergents.  Bloomberg also runs a story on new vehicle sales which are in a no-growth phase. (The total market equals about 1,000 vehicles a month.  Top seller Toyota has about one quarter of the market.)  Meanwhile SABI reports that truck and bus sales are in a free fall.  "Bus sales fell from 250 units per year in the past to nearly 120 units at present. Truck sales fell from 650 to 250 units over the period."  Rentals, partly in response, are going up.


OTHER BUSINESS  Companies or industries which had news on the wires today include:  Manhattan Minerals,  Construcciones Metallicas Union,  NovaSalud EPS, Disco Ahold, PlusPetrol, BellSouth, the sugar industry, the telecom industry, the fishing industry, Rimac International Insurance, Aguaytia Energy, Peru Rail, and Sindicato Energico.          Bloomberg runs a report from Chile about the Luchetti case: a Peruvian judge issued arrest warrants for several representatives of the Chilean company.

MAKING PEACE The Canadian Newswire reports that a conference on "Building Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility" begins in Calgary tomorrow.  Peruvian participants include:  Felipe Cantuarias, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Compania Minera Antamina,  Diego de la Torre, Chairman, La Viga, Kurt Schultz-Rhonhof, Executive Director, Peru Institute for Corporate Social Responsibility; President, Peru-German, Chamber of Commerce.


RIVER WOLVES  The Financial Times offers a travel piece on searching for giant river otters in Madre de Dios.  Rainforest Expeditions gets a positive plug.


SILVER SCREEN IN CHICAGO  The Chicago Tribune reports on tonight's 7:00 p.m. showing of the Peruvian movie 'Alias La Gringa' preceded by "tapas, paella, and sangria."  The ten-year old movie is a political drama about a cavalier criminal (la gringa) with the ability to escape from any jail.  Reservations are required.


BIG MATCH  The Agence France Press includes, in its list of upcoming sporting events, Friday's World Cup Conmebol qualifying match in San Cristobal between Peru and Venezuela.  Peru is currently seventh in a list of ten teams.  Fifa also has running news on the games.


QUICK READ  The Chicago Tribune includes the title "Fragile Branches: Travels Through the Jewish Diaspora" by James Ross (Riverhead) among new, recently-released paperbacks.  Ross' look at unusual Jewish communities includes a chapter on Peru.



SUNDAY   September 30, 2001

LESSONS FROM PERU  The Los Angeles Times uses four countries' experience with terrorism to examine what options the USA may have.  It's case study on Peru (written by Sebastian Rotella, the paper's Latin American correspondent)  is a comparative study which asks "Who defeated terrorism: Montesinos, the ruthless spy, or Antonio Ketin Vidal, the bookish cop?" Its desultory and highly debatable conclusion: "in the crucial years of the struggle, Peru could have won the war without both the cop and the spy."  The Miami Herald runs a piece which flat out declares that the Shining Path will not be within the purview of the American war on terrorism.


GENUINE DOCUMENTS   The British newspaper People runs an interview with soccer star Nolberto Solano, currently caught in an immigration scandal, in which he declares: "I haven't played using a Greek passport while I have been in England." (He also defends his right to play for the Peruvian national team, particularly for the upcoming Conmebol game with Argentina in November.)  The Bergen Record  (New Jersey, USA) investigates the involvement of Peruvians in the illicit market of driver liscences and other identification.


REVIEWS  London's Guardian runs a personality piece on John Malkovich who has "has just directed his first film, The Dancer Upstairs, which is based on the true story of the Shining Path in Peru."    And the Times of London reviews "The White Rock" by Hugh Thomson, a travelogue on searching for 'lost' Incan fortresses.  The review in London's Independent earlier in the month serves the reader better.

LOLLING DOWN THE AMAZON  The Los Angeles Times offers information on traveling down the Amazon on board the Amatista, an "expedition-style 28-passenger river ship" which is "air-conditioned, has a private bath in each cabin and serves international and Peruvian cuisine."   Tickets begin around US$3,500.